top of page
  • Writer's pictureFutur Star

3 fashionably fatal sins discovered on runways

Kerby Jean-Raymond has always built Pyer Moss around black history and has continuously explored what it means to be black in America, from having a live gospel choir blending music and political message; a sermon by writer Casey Gerald featuring the topics of enslavement; to casting only POC models in his shows. Jean-Raymond was the first black designer to officially show on the Paris Couture Week schedule last year, and it was true Black Camp at its best. The collection, which honors black inventions, was presented at the Westchester County mansion of Madame C.J. Walker, the first female African-American self-made millionaire.


With that said, there's no denying that fashion's journey to diversity has been a long and winding one, but credit must be given to brands that are actively addressing the issue. Christopher Bailey dedicated the Autumn/Winter 2018 collection to the LGBTQ+ community for his final show as President and Chief Creative Officer at Burberry. "There has never been a more important time to say that our strength and creativity lie in our diversity," Bailey said in a statement. Aside from looks emblazoned with its iconic rainbow checks, the fashion house also donated to three community charities: the Albert Kennedy Trust, the Trevor Project, and ILGA.



PRIDE



Kerby Jean-Raymond has always built Pyer Moss around black history and has continuously explored what it means to be black in America, from having a live gospel choir blending music and political message; a sermon by writer Casey Gerald featuring the topics of enslavement; to casting only POC models in his shows. Jean-Raymond was the first black designer to officially show on the Paris Couture Week schedule last year, and it was true Black Camp at its best. The collection, which honors black inventions, was presented at the Westchester County mansion of Madame C.J. Walker, the first female African-American self-made millionaire.


With that said, there's no denying that fashion's journey to diversity has been a long and winding one, but credit must be given to brands that are actively addressing the issue. Christopher Bailey dedicated the Autumn/Winter 2018 collection to the LGBTQ+ community for his final show as President and Chief Creative Officer at Burberry. "There has never been a more important time to say that our strength and creativity lie in our diversity," Bailey said in a statement. Aside from looks emblazoned with its iconic rainbow checks, the fashion house also donated to three community charities: the Albert Kennedy Trust, the Trevor Project, and ILGA.



GREED



"Money is the world's biggest fetish," Creative Director Demna Gvasalia said backstage at Balenciaga's Spring/Summer 2023 show. The French Maison presented a fetish-inspired collection filled with full-body latex suits and stark black outfits at the New York Stock Exchange, aka the heart of American capitalism. Garde-Robe, the brand's new line of beautifully draped blouses and tailored outerwear, was sandwiched between them all, as were sporty looks that confirmed the brand's rumored collaboration with Adidas.


Meanwhile, Demna's founded brand Vetements, which is now run by his brother Guram Gvasalia, printed 1,000 fake million-dollar bills to create the set, alluding to the ephemeral nature of wealth. The brand is "pushing to redefine the couture and savoir-faire of previous generations for the new era," inspired by the Nouveau Riche, which includes social media and Bitcoin millionaires. The result? Boxy coats and jackets are paired with oversized shirts and hoodies; velour tracksuits are reinvented as evening gowns; tailored suits are crafted from jersey fabric and more.


LUST



When you think of lust, you immediately think of the late Thierry Mugler's provocative, futurist femininity and architectural couture aesthetic. Although he retired from the fashion industry in 2002, he remained one of the industry's visionaries for high-voltage fashion. Some of his most iconic looks include the S/S '92 Harley Davidson corset, which mirrored the front of a motorcycle; the S/S '95 Birth of Venus gown, which Cardi B wore to the 2019 Grammy Awards; and Kim Kardashian's 2019 Met Gala "wet" gown, which Mugler created after coming out of retirement. The designer passed away earlier this year, but one thing is certain: his extravagant legacy lives on.


The fashion industry has seen a plethora of emerging talents in recent years, but London-based Albanian designer Nensi Dojaka is without a doubt one of the creatives making the most noise. Her ultra-feminine designs, which play with deconstructed details, sheer fabrics, and delicate strings, have earned her a slew of A-list fans, including Rihanna and Zendaya, as well as It-girls Bella Hadid and Emily Ratajkowski.


Helia Mohammadi Social Media Specialist Adicator Digital Marketing Agency


4 views0 comments
bottom of page