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Andrea Pompilio Takes Onitsuka Tiger Autumn/Winter 2022 to Greater Levels.


Andrea Pompilio Takes Onitsuka Tiger Autumn/Winter 2022
Andrea Pompilio Takes Onitsuka Tiger Autumn/Winter 2022

Andrea Pompilio could have gone to extremes for his first physical exhibition, the Onitsuka Tiger Autumn Winter 2022 Show, with dramatic logomania, silhouettes, and colors to signify his stamp on the brand. However, he chose the moniker "Shadow" to tribute to the Japanese aesthetic of "purity and austerity" that ushered in the 1980s.


To give one (or a Gen Z-er) some context, the 1980s were the point at which Japanese youth embraced the "newness" of the era while rejecting the values of previous generations. In other words, they wanted to dress like adults without looking like the adults they grew up with. This marked the beginning of what historians refer to as the DC Boom (Design and Character) and the first Japanese fashion craze.


While the Onitsuka Tiger Autumn Winter 2022 Show depicts the DC Boom in a carefully edited show of 34 looks — the underground culture scene, the boy-meets-girl-meets-gender-neutrality, and the esoterics of ninjas — the collection's messaging is straightforward. To live the active life he currently leads, he needs active-looking clothing. Even better if it's something entirely new.


Here, are our 5 favorite looks from the show




Look 3


A theme that goes throughout the collection and is employed virtually tromp l'oeil: punk-looking spikes reminiscent of the embellishments worn on coats in the 1980s.
















Look 4


A Pompilio classic, a play on proportion at the Onitsuka Tiger Autumn Winter 2022 show presentation.


















Look 9


Another pattern from the 1980s that has been modernised is the flame print, which was popular on Sukajan tourist jackets and was considered the holy grail of souvenirs.
















Look 11


The brand calls these "maxi Bermuda pants," but we call them shin-grazers that look best with clunky leather shoes.


















Look 12


The flame symbol is now used on knitwear, resembling the form seen in Y2K Japanese fashion magazines like Kera.





















Helia Mohammadi

Social Media Specialist
































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